Morris County Acting Prosecutor Announces the Sentencing of Former Morris Plains Officer

October 30, 2020

 

Morris County Acting Prosecutor Robert J. Carroll, Acting Chief of Investigations Christoph K. Kimker, and Morris Plains Police Chief Michael M. Koroski announce the sentencing of Adam J. Klymko, 31, on Theft by Unlawful Taking on October 30, 2020.

On or about March 2, 2020, the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office received an allegation that Morris Plains PBA Local 254 was the victim of a theft and that the defendant was believed to have withdrawn monies from the PBA Local 254 operating and fundraising account.  At the time of the thefts, the defendant was the PBA Treasurer and a Morris Plains Police Officer.  The Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Specialized Crimes Unit commenced an investigation into the allegation and, based on bank account information obtained during the investigation, it was determined that the thefts occurred using banking applications from a cellular telephone; ATM and counter withdrawls.

On September 15, 2020, the defendant plead guilty to one count of Theft by Unlawful Taking, in violation of N.J.S.A. 2C:20-3a, a crime of the third degree, based on the defendant’s criminal activity on various dates between January 1, 2018 and March 1, 2020.

On October 30, 2020, the Hon. David H. Ironson, J.S.C., Superior Court of New Jersey, Morris Vicinage, sentenced the defendant to non-custodial probation for a term of five (5) years with the special condition that the defendant make restitution, via monthly payments of $1,438.00, through the Morris County Probation Department, to Morris Plain PBA Local 254, in the total amount of $86,275.57. As part of the plea agreement, Judge Ironson ordered the defendant’s forfeiture of public office/employment and the defendant is forever disqualified from holding any position of honor, trust or profit under the State or any of its administrative or political subdivisions.

Acting Prosecutor Carroll would like to thank the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Specialized Crimes Division, Financial Crimes Unit and the Morris Plains Police Department, whose efforts contributed to the investigation and prosecution of this case.

Inquiries concerning this press release should be directed to Public Information Officer Meghan Knab at [email protected] or by phone at 973-829-8159.                    

Morris County Residents Urged to Secure Their Vehicles, Remove Key Fobs

October 30, 2020

 

Morris County Acting Prosecutor Robert J. Carroll, Morris County Acting Chief of Detectives Chris Kimker, Morris County Sheriff James Gannon and President of the Morris County Police Chiefs’ Association, Chester Police Chief Thomas Williver, remind residents to always lock their vehicles and residences, and to take key fobs and valuables out of their vehicles, even if the vehicle is parked in a driveway or garage.

The Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Intelligence Unit, Morris County Auto Theft Task Force, and Morris County Sheriff’s Trends and Analysis Team (MCSTAT) has been combating the recent trend of thefts of unlocked vehicles throughout northern New Jersey that are stolen by organized thieves targeting our communities. Specifically, during 2018, 2019, and 2020, Morris County law enforcement identified a significant increase in motor vehicle burglaries and thefts within the county.  In total, there were 640 motor vehicles stolen in Morris County during this three-year period.  Law enforcement has found that these vehicles are often stolen or burglarized during the overnight hours while residents are sleeping. Many of the vehicles taken by thieves were left unlocked, with key fobs left inside the car.  87% of the vehicles stolen in Morris County in 2020 have had keys or a key fob located within the vehicle.  Thieves often target luxury vehicles but also steal other vehicles to commit violent crimes, including robberies.

It is also important that residents remain vigilant and report any suspicious activity to local law enforcement.  A recent criminal behavior has also included vehicle entry to steal garage door openers enabling access to the home itself, clearly escalating the potential danger to our citizens.   It is imperative that each night, residents follow a routine of checking if their vehicles are locked and doors secured, including their garage doors, portable openers and keys before going to sleep.

Morris County Law Enforcement is working collectively to disrupt these organized thieves. We are asking the public to do their part by taking preventative steps to secure their homes, garages and motor vehicles.

We also ask you to help us solve crimes by reporting to us any suspicious activity that you view on your personal surveillance cameras. Please report this information to us even if you are not the victim of a crime because it may assist law enforcement in solving other thefts.  Please provide a copy of this suspicious camera footage to your local police department.

Acting Morris County Prosecutor Robert J. Carroll stated, “The Morris County Prosecutor’s Office is committed to working with local law enforcement to make our communities safe and secure.  The Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Intelligence Unit, in conjunction with local law enforcement, will continue to be guided by intelligence and respond to crime trends in our community to make Morris County a great place to live and work.”

Morris County Sheriff James Gannon stated, “Almost all of the cars stolen in Morris County this year were taken because the fob was left in the vehicle. These criminals have several ways of determining which vehicles contain the electronic keys before approaching them. My strong recommendation is this – take your key fob in the house and place it on your nightstand. Making your car inaccessible is the greatest deterrent.  Not only does this habit safeguard your vehicle but if you hear activity outside, you can remotely turn on your car lights from bed, or activate your car alarm to scare the would-be thieves away.”

Morris County Chiefs of Police Association President Thomas Williver stated: “This pandemic has not slowed down the car thieves a bit.  The Morris County Chiefs of Police Association can’t stress to our citizens enough to remember to take your key fobs out of your vehicles and lock your doors at all times.  The task force is making great progress and will continue to work hard to bring these thieves to justice.”

Together, law enforcement and residents can prevent these crimes from occurring.

Morris County Residents Urged to Secure Their Vehicles,  Remove Key Fobs

Inquiries concerning this press release should be directed to Public Information Officer Meghan Knab at [email protected] or by phone at 973-829-8159.

The public is reminded to report any unfolding crime to their local police department by calling 911 or for non-emergencies the public should use their local police department’s non-emergency phone number.

 

 

 

Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Participates in Bias Incident Awareness & the Black Community Forum

October 30, 2020

Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Detective Supervisor Patrick LaGuerre participated in the “Bias Incident Awareness & the Black Community” virtual forum on Wednesday, October 28, 2020. Held in partnership with the New Jersey Office of the Attorney General, New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice and New Jersey Bias Crimes Officers Association, the forum discussed how to recognize/report bias incidents and how reports are handled. The forum also explored the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and community trust-building.

A member of the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Bias Crimes Unit, Detective Supervisor LaGuerre joined Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office Lieutenant Natischa Clark in explaining the difference between a bias crime and a bias incident.

Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Participates in Bias Incident Awareness & the Black Community Forum

Other bias education presenters included NJ Division on Civil Rights Director Rachel Wainer Apter, NJ Division of Criminal Justice Training & Outreach Liaison, David S. Leonardis, President of the NJ Bias Crimes Officers Association, David D’Amico, and NJ Division of Criminal Justice Detective Brian Christensen.

The event also explored how communities and law enforcement can build and strengthen their relationship. Moderated by Deputy Attorney General Bryn Whittle, panelists included Perry Mays, Chair of the Coalition for a Safer Community, Pastor John Taylor, Chair of the Capital City Community Coalition, Burlington City Police Department Chief John Fine and Rhudell Snelling, Director of Community Engagement & Clergy Affairs for the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office.

The Morris County Prosecutor’s Office has taken proactive steps to educate the public about bias crimes and incidents. Last May, the MCPO hosted a live webinar on bias crimes and reporting procedures during the COVID-19 health emergency. Prior to the health emergency, Detective Supervisor LaGuerre and Supervising Assistant Prosecutor Samantha DeNegri held numerous presentations at Morris County middle and high schools to teach students how to properly report incidents of bullying and exercise good judgment when it comes to what you post online or share with friends. The MCPO also hosts an annual seminar to educate superintendents and other administrators.

Acting Morris County Prosecutor Robert J. Carroll said “The Morris County Prosecutor’s Office has always made investigating potential bias crimes a priority. This year has seen a sharp increase in online communication for business, schooling and recreation, and with it, an uptick in the number of reported bias incidents. It is more important than ever to inform the community that just because you are online, it does not make this type of intimidation acceptable. No one should be made to feel unwelcome in Morris County.”

Inquiries concerning this press release should be directed to Public Information Officer Meghan Knab at [email protected].